Lifespan Respite
Technical Assistance Center

Needs Assessments, Caregiver and Provider Surveys, and Additional Resources

Alabama

Alabama Lifespan Respite Network (ALRN) provided sample letters, family caregiver and provider surveys, and the results. The survey was designed and conducted by the University of Alabama at Birmingham in collaboration with ALRN:

For PPT presentation by Dr. Brian Geiger and Dr. Marcia O'Neal on needs assessment, see "Resources" below.

Arizona

Mohler MJ, Brown V (2008). Arizona Respite Care Throughout the Lifespan: Characterizing Unmet Needs. Tucson, AZ: University of Arizona, Arizona Center on Aging, College of Medicine.  This needs assessment was carried out to determine the unmet need for respite among the underserved in the state. Better understanding of caregiver needs- who is adequately served, who is underserved, and who is unserved - is important so as to appropriately plan and target state respite services. What was learned has been used for two purposes: 1) to inform allocation and targeted outreach for State of Arizona Lifespan Respite Care Program resource use, and 2) to inform statewide Lifespan Respite Care Program information and referral, coordination, reimbursement and training policies, and future research. http://www.azcaregiver.org/PDF/Az_RespiteCare_Lifespan.pdf

Delaware

Becker, Lisa; Tracy Mann, MA, and Tim Brooks, EdD. (2007) Respite Care in Delaware: The Delaware Lifespan Respite Information Network, Report to the Governor's Commission on Community-Based Alternatives for Individuals with Disabilities. The University of Delaware Center for Disabilities Studies in partnership with the Delaware Caregivers Support Coalition. Several organizations in Delaware, including the Delaware Caregivers Support Coalition, the Delaware chapter of the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP), and the Center for Disabilities Studies at the University of Delaware, examined the issue of respite care services over a three-year period.  Each of these organizations conducted policy analysis and surveys of families. All organizations found that, while there are some good sources of respite support in the state, there was a need for expanded respite services, a centralized database, and a way to link respite providers to caregivers in need of services.  The report summarizes these findings. Click here.

Caregiver Survey (2004)

Provider Survey (2004)

Colorado

Colorado Respite Provider Survey, 2012

District of Columbia

Respite Provider Survey, 2011

Idaho

Idaho Caregiver Needs and Respite Capacity Report, 2014

Kansas

2009 Kansas Lifespan Respite Survey

2009 Kansas State Lifespan Respite Survey, Statement

Maryland

Understanding Caregiver Needs in Maryland: Summary of Key Findings: Caregiver Survey Maryland 2015

Massachusetts

       Family Caregiver Respite Service Needs Questionnaire

Minnesota

Final Report: Caregiver Support Service Assessment (metro area)

Caregiver Support Assessment Survey (metro area)

2013 Statewide Survey of Providers that offer Caregiver Support Services (pdf)

2013 Announcement of Statewide Survey

Montana

Caregiver Survey Results Summary

Provider Survey

Caregiver Survey 

Nevada

Nevada Lifespan Respite Care Program Data on Caregivers 2012, Final Report

New Hampshire

PPT Slides of Results of New Hampshire Lifespan Respite Program

2011 Needs Assessment of Family Caregivers

Family Caregiver Survey

Results of Lifespan Respite Caregiver Survey

Texas

Caregiver Characteristics Associated with Use of Respite Care: Results from a Texas 2012 Statewide Survey, Alison Little and Kristin Christensen, PPT Slides from National Lifespan Respite Conference

Survey Instrument: Caregiver Survey

Additional Resources

Designing and Implementing a Needs Assessment. Brian F. Geiger, EdD, FAAHE & Marcia R. O'Neal, PhD, University of Alabama at Birmingham, School of Education, College of Arts and Sciences and Center for Educational Accountability.

 

Both of the following resources apply more directly to an individual respite program, but many of the same principles can be applied to a statewide needs assessment:

ARCH Fact Sheet #27. Sticky Figures: Using a Needs Assessment (Sept. 1993)
A thorough examination of the process of developing, implementing, and documenting a needs assessment. Various data collecting methods are examined in detail. Written by David B. Langmeyer, evaluation consultant.  http://www.archrespite.org/images/docs/Factsheets/fs_27-needs_assessment.pdf

Bringing Respite to Your Community: A Start-up Manual.  ARCH. This manual gives step-by-step instructions on how to begin a respite care program. The 332-page book includes chapters on needs assessment, the planning process, program models, budget, collaboration, marketing, funding, administrative policies and procedures, staffing, daily operations, and evaluation. Included are sample forms, policies, job descriptions, and other resources that can help existing programs reevaluate the design of their current services.   http://www.archrespite.org/productspublications/products-and-publications

Lifespan Respite

Technical Assistance Center

ARCH National Respite Network and Resource Center

4016 Oxford Street

Annandale, VA 22003

(703) 256-2084 www.archrespite.org

This project is supported, in part by grant number 90LT0002, from the U.S. Administration for Community Living, Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, D.C. 20201. Grantees undertaking projects under government sponsorship are encouraged to express freely their findings and conclusions. Points of view or opinions do not, therefore, necessarily represent official Administration for Community Living policy.

 

The ARCH National Respite Network and Resource Center is a division of the Chapel Hill Training-Outreach Project, Inc. | 800 Eastowne Drive, Chapel Hill, NC, 27514 | www.chtop.org

 

 

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